Missed diagnosis and no treatment: BPD’s risk to adolescents

Borderline Personality Disorder is hard to diagnose in troubled teenagers and even harder to treat.
Borderline Personality Disorder is hard to diagnose in troubled teenagers and even harder to treat.

CLICK HERE to watch Part One of W5’s report on BPD. (Available only to Rogers subscribers.)

CLICK HERE to watch Part Two.

Tom Kennedy, W5

Published Friday, October 23, 2015 1:12PM EDT

The contrast is striking. Katherine Duff gives off the attractive aura of an 18-year-old woman in good health and good humour. But when she begins to speak of what she has been dealing with since she was a child, a different image emerges.

“Every single day seems like it’s going to be the end,” she told W5. “Every single thing that you do requires so much work that you always are wondering if it’s worth it, if you should just give up now.”

When Katherine was 15, she did give up and tried to end her own life. She survived and then tried again at 16. Her parents had begun a desperate search to try to find out what was wrong with her, and to find a treatment that would help her. Eventually, they would learn she was suffering from a psychiatric condition called, Borderline Personality Disorder. Or BPD.